Wine Tasting - Old World vs New World
25
Jun

The Priory Hotel wine tasting is set for June. The event features vintage imported wines.

Musical entertainment by James Graff. And as always, ...

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Wine Tasting - Vino de Espana
16
Jul

July's Priory Hotel wine tasting promises to be HOT. Featured are Winebow Wines with a theme of Vino de Espana.

Musical entertainment by Gary ...

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Priory Hotel and Grand Hall Temporarily Closed
Monday, March 16, 2020

Please note that the Priory Hotel and Grand Hall will be closed to overnight guests and other patrons upon the order of Governor Wolf that non-essential businesses be closed due to ...

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Priory and Mansions on Fifth Coronavirus Policy
Friday, March 13, 2020

Priory Hospitality Group Information on the Coronavirus

The ownership, management and staff of the Priory Hospitality Group have been carefully monitoring the coronavirus outbreak ...

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The History of the Priory Hotel


Exterior of what is now The Grand Hall

In the Path of Progress

In the early 1970’s, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation announced that the route of the long-planned Interstate 279 feeder highway (from downtown Pittsburgh to the northern suburbs) would wind directly through the location of the St. Mary’s Church and Priory (not to mention the school and Lyceum, which were located across Nash Street and which were eventually demolished).

After exhaustive negotiations between the diocese and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and despite St. Mary’s rich history and historic landmark status, it was agreed that the state would pay $1,294,000 for the church and adjacent building, including the priory.

This left the parish in an uncertain state for nearly a decade.  It continued to occupy the priory building and church as a tenant, but the flock dwindled for the doomed church.  Toward the end, there were only two priests left to occupy the massive priory and the majority of parishioners were single retirees – widows and widowers


The Priory Courtyard

The coup de grace came eight years after the state took control of the property.  On August 31, 1981, Bishop Vincent M. Leonard issued a decree of suppression of St. Mary’s Church.  Four weeks later, on Sunday, September 27, 1981, Father Bede Hasso walked into the first full house the church had seen in years and offered St. Mary’s final mass.  The following day the parish, with the remainder of its fold being absorbed into Our Lady Queen of Peace parish, closed forever.

Next: Saved from the Wrecking Ball